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СОР_Физика_ОГН_10 класс_англ



Methodological recommendations for summative assessment

 

on the subject of “Physics”

 

Grade 10

(social and humanitarian direction)

 

  

Nur-Sultan, 2019

These methodological recommendations for Summative Assessment are designed to assist teachers in planning, organizing and carrying out Summative Assessment in Physics for students in the 10th grade in the social and humanitarian direction. The methodological recommendations are aligned with the Subject Programme and Course plan. Summative Assessment in Grade 10 is conducted in Terms 1,2, 3 and 4.

Assignments for summative assessment for the section / cross-cutting theme will allow the teacher to determine the level of achievement of the learning objectives by the students for each term.

For a summative assessment for a section of the topic, the methodological recommendations comprise tasks, assessment criteria with descriptors and marks for conducting Summative Assessment across the units. Also the book describes the possible levels of educational achievement of students (rubrics). Assignments with descriptors and marks are of an advisory in nature. Guidelines are intended for teachers, school administrators, methodologists of education departments, school and regional coordinators and other stakeholders for criteria based assessment. In preparing the guidelines, resources were used (drawings, photographs, texts, video and audio materials, etc.) that are publicly available on official websites.


 

CONTENTS

TERM 1. 4

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT TASKS. 4

Summative assessment for the unit Kinematics. 4

Summative assessment for the unit Dynamics. 8

Summative assessment for the units Statics and hydrostatics,  Laws of conservation, Hydrodynamics. 12

TERM 2. 18

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT TASKS. 18

Summative assessment for the unit Molecular physics. 18

Summative assessment for the units Gas laws and Fundamentals of thermodynamics. 22

Summative assessment for the unit Liquids and solids. 26

TERM 3. 29

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT TASKS. 29

Summative assessment for the unit Electrostatics. 29

Summative assessment for the unit ‘Direct current’. 34

Summative assessment for the unit Current in different environmental conditions. 38

TERM 4. 41

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT TASKS. 41

Summative assessment for the unit Magnetic fields. 41

Summative assessment for the unit Electromagnetic induction. 46

 

 

 

TERM 1

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT TASKS

Summative assessment for the unit Kinematics

Learning objectives

10.1.1.1 – apply kinematic equations when solving calculation problems and analyse distance-time graphs

10.1.1.2 – give examples of relative velocity the velocity-addition formula and vector-addition formula from a daily life

10.1.1.3 – define the values indicating the curvilinear motion

 

Assessment criteria

A learner

·         Applies kinematic equations to solve problems through calculations and analyses distance-time graph

·         Makes use of vector-addition formula to solve problems

·         Determines the values indicating curvilinear motion

Level of thinking skills

 

Application

Higher order thinking skills

Duration

25 minutes

Tasks

1. Fig. 1.1 is a distance  time graph showing the motion of an object.

(а)     (і) Describe the motion shown for the first 2 s, calculating any relevant quantity.

(ii) After 2 s the object accelerates.

On Fig. 1.1, sketch a possible shape of the graph for the next 2 s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(b) Fig. 1.2 shows the axes for a speed / time graph.

Fig. 1.2

On Fig. 1.2, draw

(i) the graph of the motion for the first 2 s as shown in Fig. 1.1,

(ii) an extension of the graph for the next 2 s, showing the object accelerating at 2 m/s2.

(с) Describe how a speed / time graph shows an object that is stationary.

 

2. A boat attempts to travel straight across a river at a speed 0.75 m/s. The current in the river however, flows at a speed of 1.20 m/s to the right.

(a) Draw a picture, which shows the boat trying to go straight across the river.

(b) Calculate the magnitude of the boat’s velocity relative to an observer on the shore.

(c) Find the direction of the boat’s velocity relative to an observer on the shore.

 

3. The drum of a washing machine rotates 1200 times in 1 minute.

(a) What is the period and frequency of the drum?

 

(b) What is the angular speed of the drum?

 

(c) If the diameter of the drum is 40 cm, what is the tangential speed of a point on the drum?


 


 

Assessment criteria

Task

Descriptor

Mark

A learner

Applies kinematic equations to solve calculating problems and analyses distance-time graph

1

describes the motion of an object;

1

calculates the speed of the object;

1

draws a possible shape of the graph for the next 2s;

1

draws the speed time graph of an object;

1

draws an extension of the graph for the next 2 s;

1

defines the clear gradient using a straight line;

1

describes that an object is stationary using a speed/time graph;

1

Makes use of the vector-addition formula to solve problems

2

draws the corresponding diagrams and shows the direction of the flow of the water and the boat;

1

applies a vector addition rule;

1

calculates the magnitude of the boat’s velocity relative to an observer on the shore;

1

finds the direction of the boat’s velocity;

1

Determines the values indicating curvilinear motion

3

finds rotation period of the drum;

1

finds rotation frequency of the drum;

1

calculates the angular velocity of the drum;

1

calculates tangential speed of a point on the drum.

1

Total mark

15


Rubric for providing information to parents on the results of summative assessment for the unit Kinematics

 

Learner’s full name _________________________________________

 

 

Assessment criteria

Level of academic achievement

Low

Medium

High  

Applies kinematic equations to solve calculation problems and analyses distance-time graph

Describes the motion of the object, but has difficulties in calculating the speed of the object/ drawing the speed vs time graph of the object/  showing the clear gradient using a straight line.

Describes the motion of an object. Correctly calculates the speed of the object, but makes mistakes in drawing the speed vs time graph of the object/ showing the clear gradient using a straight line.  

Describes the motion of an object, correctly calculates the speed of the object, draws the speed/time graph of the object and shows the clear gradient using a straight line.

Makes use of vector-addition formula to solve problem

 

Draws the corresponding diagrams, but has difficulties in applying the vector addition rule and finding the direction of the object velocity.

Draws the corresponding diagrams, but makes mistakes to applying the vector addition rule /to finding the direction of the object velocity.

Correctly draws the corresponding diagrams,  applies the vector addition rule, and finds the direction of the object velocity.

Determines the values indicating curvilinear motion  

Writes the formulas for finding the kinematic quantities of curvilinear motion, but has difficulties in calculating them.

Calculates the kinematic values of curvilinear motion, but makes mistakes in calculating the period/frequency/angular frequency/tangential speed.

Correctly calculates the kinematic values of curvilinear motion.


Summative assessment for the unit Dynamics

Learning objectives

10.1.2.1 – understand Newton's laws and define the net force;

10.1.2.2 – understand the law of universal gravitation and describe the motion of spacecraft;

10.1.2.3 – describe changes in the physical values of a body dropped at an angle horizontally and vertically

 

Assessment criteria

A learner

·         Uses Newton's laws and defines the resultant force

·         States Newton’s law of gravitation and describes what is meant by a geostationary orbit

·         Describes changes in the physical values of a body thrown at an angle horizontally and vertically

 

Level of thinking skills

Application

Higher order thinking skills

 

Duration

20 minutes

 

Tasks

1.   A metal ball of mass 0.30 kg and weight 3.0N is held so that it is below the surface of oil.

It experiences an upwards force of 0.30 N.

When the ball is released, what is its initial acceleration?

A) 1.0 m/s2

B) 9.0 m/s2

C) 10 m/s2

D) 11 m/s2

 

Figure 1.1

2.   The rocket shown in Fig. 2.1 is about to be launched.

Figure 2.1.

 

The total mass of the rocket and its full load of fuel is 2.8 × 106 kg. The constant force provided by the rocket’s motors is 3.2 × 107 N.

(a) Calculate

(i) the total weight of the rocket and the fuel,

 

weight =

(ii) the resultant force acting on the rocket,

 

resultant force =

(iii) the vertical acceleration of the rocket  immediately after lift-off.

 

acceleration =

(b) Suggest why the acceleration of the rocket increases as it rises above the Earth’s surface.

 

3.       

(a)      State Newton’s law of gravitation.

 

(b)     The Earth may be considered to be a uniform sphere of radius R equal to 6.4×106m. A satellite is in a geostationary orbit.

Describe what is meant by a geostationary orbit.

 

4.      A cannon fires a cannonball with an initial speed v at an angle α to the horizontal (Fig.4.1).

 

Figure 4.1

 

Which equation is correct for the maximum height H reached?

A)

B)

C)

D)

5.        A ball is thrown horizontally in still air from the top of a very tall building. The ball is affected by air resistance.

What happens to the horizontal and to the vertical components of the ball’s velocity?

 

horizontal component of velocity

vertical component of velocity

A)

decreases to zero

increases at a constant rate

B)

decreases to zero

increases at a constant value

C)

remains constant

increases at a constant rate

D)

remains constant

increases at a constant value

 


 

Assessment criteria

Task

Descriptor

Mark

A learner

Uses Newton's laws and defines the resultant force

1

uses Newton's second law and finds initial acceleration the ball;

1

2a

calculates the total weight of the rocket and the fuel;

1

shows all the forces which act on the rocket;

1

calculates the resultant force acting on the rocket using by Newton's second law;

1

finds the vertical acceleration of the rocket;

1

2b

describes why the acceleration of the rocket increases;

1

States Newton’s law of gravitation and describes what is meant by a geostationary orbit

3a

states Newton’s law of gravitation;

1

writes formulas of Newton’s law of gravitation;

1

3b

describes first feature of geostationary orbit;

1

describes second feature of geostationary orbit;

1

describes third feature of geostationary orbit;

1

Describes changes in the physical values of a body thrown  at an angle horizontally and vertically

4

Finds equation for the maximum height reached;

1

5

Selects horizontal and the vertical components of the ball’s velocity correctly.

1

Total mark

13

 


Rubric for providing information to parents on the results of summative assessment for the unit Dynamics

 

Learner’s full name _________________________________________

 

 

Assessment criteria

Level of academic achievement

Low

Medium

High  

Uses Newton's laws and defines the resultant force

Uses Newton's second law,  calculates the total weight, but has difficulties to find initial acceleration of the ball/ to calculate the resultant force / to describe of  the acceleration of the rocket.

 

Uses Newton's second law,  calculates the total weight, but makes mistakes to find initial acceleration of the ball/ to calculate the resultant force/ to describe the acceleration increasing of the rocket.  

Uses Newton's second law, correctly calculates the total weight and resultant force, finds the initial acceleration of the ball and describes the  increasing acceleration of the rocket.

States Newton’s law of gravitation and describes what is meant by a geostationary orbit

Experiences difficulties in stating Newton’s law of gravitation / in describing a geostationary orbit.

States Newton’s law of gravitation/ describes the characteristics of a geostationary orbit,   but makes mistakes in describing the characteristics of a geostationary orbit/stating Newton’s law.

 

Correctly states Newton’s law of gravitation and describes all characteristics of a geostationary orbit.

Describes changes in the physical values of a body thrown  at an angle  horizontally and vertically

Experiences difficulties in finding equation for the maximum height reached /in selecting horizontal and vertical components of the ball’s velocity.



Correctly finds equation for the maximum height reached/  select horizontal and vertical components of the ball’s velocity, but makes mistakes to select horizontal and vertical components of the ball’s velocity / equation for the maximum height reached.

 

Correctly finds equation for the maximum height reached/selects horizontal and vertical components of the ball’s velocity.

 

 


 


Summative assessment for the units Statics and hydrostatics,  Laws of conservation, Hydrodynamics

Learning objectives

10.1.3.1 – find a center of mass of a perfectly rigid body and explain the different types of equilibrium

10.1.3.2 – describe the Pascal's law and its application

10.1.3.3 – explain the term of hydrostatic pressure

10.1.4.1 – explain the laws of conservation

10.1.5.1 – describe the fluid-gas flows

Assessment criteria

A learner

·         Indicates the different types of equilibrium

·         Describes the center of mass of an irregularly shaped body

·         Uses pascal's law to solve a problem

·         Determines the hydrostatic pressure and force exerted on the base

·         Describes the laws of conservation

·         Explains the turbulent and laminar flows

Level of thinking skills

Application

Duration

30 minutes

Tasks:

1.    Figure 1.1 shows a Bunsen burner in three different positions.

State in which position it is in

a) stable equilibrium,

b) unstable equilibrium,

c) neutral equilibrium.

 

Figure 1.1

 

2.    A sports car is designed to be very stable when turning a corner at high speed.

Fig. 2.1 shows the position of the centre of mass of the car.

Figure 2.1

(a) State what is meant by centre of mass.

(b) State two features of the design that make the car in Fig. 2.1 stable.

1) ...................................................................................................................................

2) ...................................................................................................................................

(c) Fig. 2.2 shows an irregularly shaped piece of card.

Figure 2.2

Describe how to determine the position of the centre of mass of the piece of card.

You may draw on Fig. 2.2 or in the blank space.

 

3.    Fig. 3.1 shows an oil tank that has a rectangular base of dimensions 2.4 m by 1.5 m.

 

The tank is filled with oil of density 850 kg / m3 to a depth of 1.5 m.

a) Calculate the pressure exerted by the oil on the base of the tank

 

pressure = ......................................

b) the force exerted by the oil on the base of the tank

 

force = .......................................

Figure 3.1.

c) The force calculated in (a)(ii) is the weight of the oil. Calculate the mass of oil in the tank.

 

mass = .......................................

 

4.    The system shown in the Fig.4.1. contains a liquid.

Figure 4.1.

 

A downward force of 80N is exerted on piston K.

What will be the upward force exerted by the liquid on piston L?

 

 

5.              a) State the principle of conservation of momentum.

b) State the difference between an elastic and an inelastic collision.

 

6.        A molecule of mass m travelling at speed v hits a wall in a direction perpendicular to the wall. The collision is elastic.

What are the changes in the momentum and in the kinetic energy of the molecule caused by the collision?

 

Change in momentum

Change in kinetic energy

A)

0

0

B)

0

mv2

C)

2mv

0

D)

mv2

0

 

7.             (a)     (i) On Fig. 7.1. draw streamlines to illustrate laminar flow around the object shown.

Fig. 7.1

(ii) On Fig. 7.2. draw streamlines to illustrate turbulent flow around the object.

Fig. 7.2

 

(b)     Describe one of the differences between laminar flow and turbulent flow. 

 


 

Assessment criteria

Task

Descriptor

Mark

A learner

Indicates different types of equilibrium

1a

shows position of stable equilibrium;

1

1b

shows outs position of unstable equilibrium;

1

1c

shows position of neutral equilibrium;

1

Describes center of mass of irregularly shaped body

2a

explains the meaning of center of mass;

1

2b

describes first feature of the design that shows a stable car;

1

describes second feature of the design that shows a stable car;

1

2c

draws position of the center of mass of the piece of card;

1

describes how to determine the position of the center of mass of the piece of card;

1

Determines the hydrostatic pressure and force exerted on the base

3a

writes the formula of the pressure exerted by the oil on the base of the tank;

1

calculates the pressure exerted by the oil on the base of the tank;

1

3b

finds the area of the base of the tank;

1

finds the force exerted by the oil on the base of the tank;

1

3c

calculates the mass of the oil in the tank;

1

Uses Pascal's law to solve problem

4

finds the upward force in the system;

1

Describes the laws of conservation

5a

states the principle of conservation of momentum;

1

states the difference between an elastic and an inelastic collision;

1

6

determines changes in the momentum and in the kinetic energy of the molecule in an elastic collision;

1

Explains turbulent and laminar flows

7a

illustrates laminar flow around the object;

1

illustrates turbulent flow around the object;

1

7b

states one of the differences between laminar flow and turbulent flow.

1

Total mark

20


 


Rubric for providing information to parents on the results of summative assessment for the unit
Statics and hydrostatics, Laws of conservation and Hydrodynamics

 

Learner’s full name _________________________________________

 

 

Assessment criteria

Level of academic achievement

Low

Medium

High  

Indicates different types of equilibrium

Experiences difficulties in stating the position of the stable, unstable and neutral equilibrium.

Makes mistakes in stating the position of the stable, unstable and neutral equilibrium.

Correctly states the position of the stable, unstable and neutral equilibrium calculates.

Describes center of mass of irregularly shaped body

 

Experiences difficulties in explaining the meaning of center of mass/ in describing the design features that show a stable car.

Describes one design feature that show a stable car, but makes mistakes in explaining the meaning center of mass/ in describing other design features that show a stable car.

 

Explains the meaning of center of mass/ describes features of the design that show a stable car.

Determines the hydrostatic pressure and force exerted on the base

Experiences difficulties in calculating the pressure and force exerted by the oil on the base of the tank/ the mass of oil in the tank/ mass of the oil.

Uses the formula for hydrostatic pressure, but makes mistakes in calculating the pressure and force exerted by the oil on the base of the tank/ the mass of oil in the tank/ mass of the oil.

Calculates the pressure and force exerted by the oil on the base of the tank/ the mass of oil in the tank/ mass of the oil.

Uses Pascal's law to solve a problem

Experiences difficulties using Pascal's law to find the upward force exerted by the liquid on piston L.

Makes mistakes in writing the equation of Pascal’s law/ calculating the upward force.

 

 

 

Uses the Pascal's law to correctly find the upward force exerted by the liquid on piston L.

Describes the laws of conservation

 

Experiences difficulties in stating the principle of conservation of momentum and the difference between an elastic and an inelastic collision/ in defining changes in the momentum and in the kinetic energy of the molecules in an elastic collision.

 

 


States the principle of conservation of momentum and the difference between an elastic and an inelastic collision, but makes mistakes in defining changes in the momentum and in the kinetic energy of the molecules in an elastic collision.

States the principle of conservation of momentum and the difference between an elastic and an inelastic collision/defines changes in the momentum and in the kinetic energy of the molecules in an elastic collision.

Explains turbulent and laminar flows

Experiences difficulties in illustrating laminar flow and turbulent flow around the object/in stating one of the differences between laminar flow and turbulent flow. 

Makes mistakes in illustrating laminar flow turbulent flow around the object/in stating one of the differences between laminar flow and turbulent flow. 

Illustrates laminar flow and turbulent flow around the object/ states one of the differences between laminar flow and turbulent flow.

 

 


TERM 2

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT TASKS


Summative assessment for the unit Molecular physics

Learning objectives

10.2.1.1 – describe molecular-kinetic theory and ideal gas model

10.2.1.2 – describe the models of rigid bodies, liquids and gases according to molecular-kinetic theory

10.2.1.3 – distinguish the structures of crystalline and non-crystalline solids

 

Assessment criteria

A learner

·         Interprets the assumptions of the simple kinetic model of a gas

·         Makes computes of the pressure of an ideal gas

·         Describes the structures of crystalline solids, polymers and amorphous materials

·         Explains arrangement of molecules in the liquids, solids and gases

 

Level of thinking skills

 

Application

Higher order thinking skills

Duration

25 minutes

Tasks

1.             (a) Describe the motion and interaction of the molecules of ideal gas.

1. ......................................................................................................................................

2. ......................................................................................................................................

(b) Use the kinetic model of gases and Newton’s laws of motion to explain how a gas exerts a pressure on the sides of its container.

 

2.    What is the absolute pressure exerted by oxygen gas, in a closed container, having  concentration, if the root-mean-square speed of the gas molecules is 500 m/s? Take

 

3.    Two states of matter are described as follows.

In state 1, the molecules are very far apart. They move about very quickly at random in straight lines until they hit something.

In state 2, the molecules are quite closely packed together. They move about at random. They do not have fixed positions.

What is state 1 and what is state 2?

 

state 1

state 2

A

gas

liquid

B

gas

solid

C

liquid

gas

D

solid

liquid

 

 

4.        A teacher shows the class examples of three states of matter. These are a solid metal block resting on a bench, a liquid in a glass beaker and a gas in a clear balloon in the laboratory.

Fig. 4.1a represents the arrangement of molecules in the solid.

(a)           (i) Complete Fig. 4.1b, to show the arrangement of molecules in the liquid.

(ii) Complete Fig. 4.1c, to show the arrangement of molecules in the gas.

(b)          (i)  In the list below, draw a ring around the state of matter that is the easiest to compress.

 

the solid                                    the liquid                                           the gas

 

(ii) In terms of its molecules, explain why this state of matter is the easiest to compress.

 

5.        Briefly describe the structures of crystalline solids, polymers and amorphous materials.

crystalline solids:

polymers:

amorphous materials:

 


 

Assessment criteria

Task

Descriptor

Mark

A learner

Interprets the assumptions of the simple kinetic model of a gas

1a

gives first assumption of the motion of ideal gas;

1

gives second assumption of the motion of ideal gas;

1

1b

explains first reason why gas exerts  pressure on the sides of its container;

1

explains second reason why gas exerts a pressure on the sides of its container;

1

explains third reason why gas exerts a pressure on the sides of its container

1

Makes computes of the pressure of an ideal gas

2

finds the mass of one oxygen molecule;

1

uses formula of kinetic theory of gases;

1

finds the absolute pressure exerted by oxygen gas;

1

Explains  arrangement of molecules in the liquids, solids and gases

3

identifies the two states of matter;

1

4a

illustrates the arrangement of molecules in the liquid;

1

illustrates the arrangement of molecules in the gas;

1

4b

identifies the state of matter that is the easiest to compress;

1

describes why this state of matter is the easiest to compress;

1

takes account of space between molecules;

1

Describes the structures of crystalline solids, polymers and amorphous materials

5

describes the structures of crystalline solids;

1

describes the structures of polymers;

1

describes the structures of amorphous materials.

1

Total mark

17


 


Rubric for providing information to parents on the results of summative assessment for the unit "Molecular physics"  

 

Learner’s full name _________________________________________

 

 

Assessment criteria

Level of academic achievement

Low

Medium

High  

Interprets the assumptions of the simple kinetic model of a gas

 

Experiences difficulties in stating assumptions of the motion and interaction of the molecules of ideal gas/ in explaining reasons how gas exerts a pressure on the sides of container.

 

Makes mistakes in stating the assumptions of the  of the motion and interaction of the molecules of ideal gas and/or in  explaining reasons how gas exerts a pressure on the sides of container.

Correctly states assumptions  of the motion and interaction of the molecules of ideal gas / explains reasons how gas exerts a pressure on the sides of container.

Makes computes the pressure of an ideal gas

 

Experiences difficulties in using formula of kinetic theory of gases/ finding the mass of one oxygen molecule/ the absolute pressure exerted by oxygen gas.

Uses formula kinetic theory of gases, but makes mistakes in finding the mass of one oxygen molecule / the absolute pressure exerted by oxygen gas.

 

Uses formula kinetic theory of gases/ finds the mass of one oxygen molecule/ the absolute pressure exerted by oxygen gas.

 

Explains  the arrangement of molecules in liquids, solids and gases

Identifies the state of matter that is the easiest to compress, but experiences difficulties in illustrating the arrangement of molecules in the liquid and gases/ in describing why this state of matter is the easiest to compress.

  

Chooses state of matter that is the easiest to compress,  but makes mistakes in  illustrating the arrangement of molecules in the liquid and gases, and/or describing why this state of matter is the easiest to compress.

 

Chooses state of matter that is the easiest to compress/ illustrates the arrangement of molecules in the liquid and gases/describes why this state of matter is the easiest to compress.

 

Describes the structures of crystalline solids, polymers and amorphous materials

 

Experiences difficulties in describing the structures of crystalline solids, polymers, amorphous materials.

 

 


Makes mistakes in describing the structures of crystalline solids/amorphous materials, and/or explaining the structures of polymers.

Correctly describes the structures of crystalline solids, polymers and amorphous materials.

 


Summative assessment for the units Gas laws and Fundamentals of thermodynamics

Learning objectives

10.2.2.1 – apply ideal gas law and distinguish gas process graphs

10.2.3.1 – explain the first and the second laws of thermodynamics

10.2.3.2 – describe the operational principles and use of heat engines

 

Assessment criteria

A learner

·         Uses ideal gas law to solve problems

·         Analyzes gas process graphs

·         States first and the second laws of thermodynamics

·         Explains the operational principles of heat engines

 

Level of thinking skills

Application

Higher order thinking skills

Duration

30 minutes

 

Tasks

1.    A truck is to cross the Sahara Desert. The journey begins just before dawn when the temperature is 3°C. The volume of air held in each tyre is 1.50 m3 and the pressure in the tyres is 3.42 × 105 Pa.

(a) Explain how the air molecules in the tyre exert a pressure on the tyre walls.

 

(b) Calculate the number of moles of air in the tyre.

 

(c) By midday the temperature has risen to 42 °C.

Calculate the pressure in the tyre at this new temperature. You may assume that no air escapes and the volume of the tyre is unchanged.

 

2.    The graph shows the changes in the ideal gas. Describe the macroscopic parameter changes in the gas for each process. Draw this process in the PV diagram below (Fig. 2.1).

Figure 2.1

Macroscopic parameters

process 1-2

process 2-3

process 3-4

process 4-1

temperature

 

 

 

 

pressure

 

 

 

 

volume

 

 

 

 

 

3.             (a) State the first law of thermodynamics in terms of the increase in internal energy ∆U, the heating Q of the system and the work W done on the system.

(b) The volume occupied by 1.00 mole of liquid water at 100 °C is 1.87 × 10–5m3. When the water is vaporised at an atmospheric pressure of 1.03 × 105 Pa, the water vapour has a volume of 2.96 × 10–2 m3. The latent heat required to vaporise 1.00 mole of water at 100 °C and 1.03 × 105 Pa is 4.05 × 104J.

Determine, for this change of state,

(i) the work W done on the system,

W = .................................. J

(ii) the heating Q of the system,

Q = .................................. J

(iii) the increase in internal energy ∆U of the system.

∆U = .................................. J

(c) State the second law of thermodynamics

 

4.   
 Describe the operational principles of a heat engine. You can draw on the Fig. 4.1.

Figure 4.1.

 

5.    The three Carnot engines shown in the Figure 5.1 operate with hot and cold reservoirs whose temperature differences are 100 K.

Figure 5.1

 

Rank the efficiencies of the engines, largest to smallest.


 

Assessment criteria

Task

Descriptor

Mark

A learner

Uses ideal gas law to solve problems

1a

gives first description of how the air molecules exert a pressure on the tyre walls;

1

gives second description of how the air molecules exert a pressure on the tyre walls;

1

1b

uses the main formula of the ideal gas law;

1

calculates the number of moles of air in the tyre;

1

1c

uses the formula of the ideal gas law;

1

calculates the pressure in the tyre at the new temperature;

1

Analyses gas process graphs

2

describes the changes in macroscopic parameters for process 1-2;

1

describes the changes in macroscopic parameters for process 2-3;

1

describes the changes in macroscopic parameters for process 3-4;

1

describes the changes in macroscopic parameters for process 4-1;

1

draws the process in the PV diagram;

1

States first and second laws of thermodynamics

3a

states the first law of thermodynamics;

1

3b

writes the formula for the work done on the system;

1

determines the work done on the system;

1

determines the heating of the system;

1

determines the internal energy of the system;

1

3c

states the second law of thermodynamics;

1

Explains the operational principles of heat engines

4

describes heat flow in heat engine;

1

describes how a heat engine operates;

1

5

calculates the efficiency for each engine;

1

arranges the efficiencies of the engines from largest to smallest.

1

Total mark

21

 


 


The rubric for providing information to parents on the results of summative assessment for the units
Gas laws and Fundamentals of thermodynamics

Learner’s full name _________________________________________

 

Assessment criteria

Level of academic achievement

Low

Medium

High  

Uses ideal gas law to solve problems

 

Experiences difficulties in giving two descriptions of how the air molecules exert a pressure on the tyre walls/using the formula of the ideal gas law/calculating the number of moles of air and the pressure in the tyre.

 

Uses  the formula of the ideal gas law, but makes mistakes  in  calculating the number of moles of air and the pressure in the tyre/ giving two descriptions of how the air molecules exert a pressure on the tyre walls.

Uses  the formula of the ideal gas law correctly to calculate the number of moles of air and the pressure in the tyre/ gives two descriptions of how the air molecules exert a pressure on the tyre walls.

Analyzes gas process graphs

 

Experiences difficulties in  describing the changes in macroscopic parameters  during the process/  drawing the process in the PV diagram.

Makes mistakes in  describing the changes in macroscopic parameters during the process/  drawing the process in the PV diagram.

Describes the changes in macroscopic parameters during the process/ draws the process in the PV diagram.

States first and the second laws of thermodynamics

 

Experiences difficulties in  stating the first and second laws of thermodynamics/ determining the work done on the system/  determining heating and  internal energy  of the system. 

 

Makes mistakes in stating the first and second laws of thermodynamics/ determining the work done on the system/  determining heating and  internal energy  of the system. 

 

States the first and second laws of thermodynamics/ determines the work done on the system/ determines heating and internal energy of the system.

Explains the operational principles of heat engines

Experiences difficulties in   describing how a heat engine operates/ arranging the efficiencies of the engines from largest to smallest.

Makes mistakes in describing how a heat engine operates/ arranging the efficiencies of the engines from largest to smallest.

Correctly  describes how a heat engine operates/ arranges the efficiencies of the engines from largest to smallest.


Summative assessment for the unit Liquids and solids

Learning objectives

10.2.4.1 – define the relative air humidity

10.2.4.2 – explain the nature of surface tension, and the role of capillary phenomena in a daily life

Assessment criteria

A learner

·         Determines the relative air humidity

·         Defines surface tension and relationship between capillary diameter and height of liquid

Level of thinking skills

Application

Duration

20 minutes

Tasks

1.    One day, the partial pressure of water vapor in the air is 2.0×103 Pa. Using the vaporization curve for water in Figure 1.1.

Determine the relative humidity if the temperature is:

 

a)                 32oC

 

b)                21oC

Figure 1.1

 

 

2. Describe two ways of increasing the relative humidity in a room.

i)……….……………………………………………………………………………………….

ii)…………………………….…………………………………………………………………

 

3. What is the relationship between capillary diameter and height of liquid column in the capillary?

 

4. Define surface tension.

 

5. The surface tension of water is 0.07 N/m. Find the weight of water supported by surface tension in a capillary tube with a radius of 0.1 mm.

 


 

Assessment criteria

Task

Descriptor

Mark

A learner

Determines the relative air humidity

1

uses the vaporization curve of liquid for finding pressure;

1

finds relative humidity at a temperature of 32°C;

1

finds relative humidity at a temperature of 21°C;

1

2

describes the first way of increasing the relative humidity in a room;

1

describes the second way of increasing the relative humidity in a room;

1

Defines surface tension and relationship between capillary diameter and height of liquid

3

shows relationship between capillary diameter and height of liquid;

1

4

writes definition of surface tension;

1

5

writes formula of surface tension;

1

determines the weight of water supported by surface tension in a capillary tube.

1

Total mark

9


Rubric for providing information to parents on the results of summative assessment for the unit Liquids and solids

 

Learner’s full name _________________________________________

 

 

Assessment criteria

Level of academic achievement

Low

Medium

High  

Determines the relative air humidity

 

Experiences difficulties in  determining the relative humidity/  describing ways of increasing the relative humidity in the room.

 

Makes mistakes in determining the relative humidity/ describing ways of increasing the relative humidity in the room.

Determines the relative humidity/  describes ways of increasing the relative humidity in the room.

Defines surface tension and relationship between capillary diameter and height of liquid

Writes formula of surface tension, but  experiences difficulties in using   equation of capillary action/ in  determining the weight of water supported by surface tension in a capillary tube.

 

Writes formula of surface tension, but makes mistakes in using   equation of capillary action/ in  determining the weight of water supported by surface tension in a capillary tube.

Writes formula of surface tension, uses   equation of capillary action and  determines the weight of water supported by surface tension in a capillary tube.

 

                                                                                                                                 


TERM 3

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT TASKS

Summative assessment for the unit Electrostatics

Learning objectives

10.3.1.1 – discuss the properties of electric fields, and define its power characteristic

10.3.1.2 – describe the action of electrostatic fields on charge motion

10.3.1.3 – compare the characteristics of gravity fields and electrostatic fields

10.3.1.4 – explain the role of a capacitor in a simple electric circuit

 

Assessment criteria

A learner

·         Describes the direction and magnitude of an electric field in the metal plates

·         Explains the effects of an electrostatic field on charged particles

·         Determines similarities and differences between electric and gravitational fields

·         Defines the role of capacitors in electrical circuits

 

Level of thinking skills

 

Application

Higher order thinking skills

Duration

25 minutes

Tasks

1.             (a)     (i) State what is meant by the direction of an electric field.

(ii) Fig. 1.1 shows a pair of oppositely-charged horizontal metal plates with the top plate positive.

Fig. 1.1

 

The electric field between the plates in Fig. 1.1 is uniform.

 

Draw lines on Fig. 1.1 to represent this uniform field. Add arrows to these lines to show the direction of the field.

 

 

 

2.             (a) Fig. 2.1 shows a very small negatively-charged oil drop in the air between a pair of oppositely charged horizontal metal plates. The oil drop does not move up or down.

Fig. 2.1

 

(i) Suggest, in terms of forces, why the oil drop does not move up or down.

(ii) Without losing any of its charge, the oil drop begins to evaporate.

State and explain what happens to the oil drop.

 

3. Determine the electric field at point P a distance 20 cm from the negatively charged particle q=-4mC.

 

4. What are the main differences between a gravitational field and an electric field?

Gravitational field

Electric field

 

 

 

 

 

5.       (a) State two functions of capacitors in electrical circuits.

1. ......................................................................................................................................

2. ......................................................................................................................................

(b) Three uncharged capacitors of capacitance C1, C2 and C3 are connected in series, as shown in Fig. 5.1.

Fig. 5.1.

 

A charge of +Q is put on plate A of the capacitor of capacitance C1.

(i) State and explain the charges that will be observed on the other plates of the capacitors. You may draw on Fig. 5.1 if you wish.

(ii) Use your answer in (i) to derive an expression for the combined capacitance of the capacitors.


 

Assessment criteria

Task

Descriptor

Mark

A learner

Describes the direction and magnitude of an electric field in the metal plates

1a

explains direction of an electric field;

1

draws lines of uniform electric field;

1

shows the direction of the field;

1

3

determines magnitude of electric field at point P;

1

shows direction of the electric field at point P;

1

Explains the effects of electrostatic field on charged particles.

2a

show directions of forces acting on negatively-charged oil drop;

1

explains why negatively-charged oil drop is not moving;

1

explains effect of evaporation of negatively-charged oil drop;

1

states changes of negatively-charged oil drop;

1

Determines differences between electric and gravitational fields

4

writes the first difference between gravitational fields and electric fields;

1

writes the second difference between gravitational fields and electric fields;

1

writes the third difference between gravitational fields and electric fields;

1

Defines the role of a capacitors in electrical circuits

5a

states the first role of a capacitors in electrical circuits;

1

states the second role of a capacitors in electrical circuits;

1

5b

illustrates the charges on the other plates of the capacitors;

1

explains the charges on capacitors;

1

derives an expression for the combined capacitance of the capacitors;

1

writes formula for combined capacitance of capacitors connected in series.

1

Total mark

18

 


Rubric for providing information to parents on the results of summative assessment for the unit Electrostatics

 

Learner’s full name _________________________________________

 

 

Assessment criteria

Level of academic achievement

Low

Medium

High  

Describes the direction and magnitude of an electric field in metal plates

Determines magnitude of electric field at point P, but experiences difficulties in explaining direction of an electric field/ drawing lines of uniform electric field/ showing the direction of the field.

 

Determines magnitude of electric field at point P, but makes mistakes in explaining direction of an electric field/ drawing lines of uniform electric field/ showing the direction of the field.

Determines magnitude and direction of electric field at point P.  Correctly draws lines of uniform electric field/ shows the direction of the field.

Explains the effects of electrostatic field on charged particles

 

Experiences difficulties in showing how directions of forces act on negatively-charged oil drop/ in explaining why negatively-charged oil drop is not moving/ explaining effect of evaporation of negatively-charged oil drop.

 

Shows how directions of forces act on negatively-charged oil drop but makes mistakes in explaining why negatively-charged oil drop is not moving /in explaining effect of evaporation of negatively-charged oil drop.

 

Correctly shows how directions of forces act on negatively-charged oil drop/

explains why negatively-charged oil drop is not moving/ explains effect of evaporation of negatively-charged oil drop.

 

Determines differences between electric and gravitational fields

Experiences difficulties in describing  the difference between gravitational fields and electric fields.





Makes mistakes in describing  the difference between gravitational fields and electric fields.

 

Correctly describes the difference between gravitational fields and electric fields.

 

Defines the role of capacitors in electrical circuits

Illustrates the charges on the plates of the capacitors, but experiences difficulties in explaining charges on capacitors/stating the roles of  capacitors in electrical circuits/ writing the formula for combined capacitance of capacitors connected in series.

Illustrates the charges on the plates of the capacitors but makes mistakes in indicating charges on capacitors/ writing formula for combined capacitance of capacitors connected in series/ stating the roles of a capacitors in electrical circuits/ deriving an expression for the combined capacitance of the capacitors.

 

Correctly illustrates the charges on the plates of the capacitors/indicates charges on capacitors/states the roles of a capacitors in electrical circuits/  derives an expression for the combined capacitance of the capacitors.

 

 

                                                                                                                                 


Summative assessment for the unit ‘Direct current’

Learning objectives

10.3.2.1 – explain the concepts of EMF and internal resistance

10.3.2.2 – explain the difference between EMF and voltage drop in external circuit (in terms of energy)

10.3.2.3 – apply Ohm's law in complete circuits, and understand the consequences of short circuit

10.3.2.4 – estimate the operational costs and power of household devices

 

Assessment criteria

A learner

·         Distinguishes between the definitions of e.m.f. and p.d. in terms of energy

·         Uses Ohm's law in complete circuits to solve problems and explains the consequences of short circuit

·         States concepts of EMF and internal resistance

·         Makes practical calculations to show working and power flow of household devices

 

Level of thinking skills

 

Application

Higher order thinking skills

Duration

25 minutes

Tasks

1.        A circuit used to measure the power transfer from a battery is shown in Fig. 1.1. The power is transferred to a variable resistor of resistance R.

The battery has an electromotive force (e.m.f.) E and an internal resistance r. There is a potential difference (p.d.) V across R. The current in the circuit is І.

By reference to the circuit shown in Fig. 1.1, distinguish between the definitions of e.m.f. and p.d.

 

2.        Two cells are connected in series. Each cell has an e.m.f. of 1.4 V and an internal resistance of 0.38 W. The combination of the cells is connected across an external circuit of resistance 1.8 W.
Calculate:

(a)   the potential difference across the external circuit.

(b) the potential difference across the terminals of each cell.

 

 

3.        A d.c. power supply of e.m.f. 12 V has an internal resistance of 2.3 W. It is accidentally shorted out across its terminals by a short length of wire of negligible resistance.

(a)   Calculate the current drawn from the supply.                                                              

(b)   Suggest why it may be dangerous to have a supply shorted out in this way.              

 

4.        For a cell, explain the terms

(a)   electromotive force (e.m.f.)

(b)   internal resistance.

 

5.             (a) What is the cost of heating a tank of water with a 3000 W immersion heater for 80 minutes if electricity costs 10t per kWh?

(b) What will be the current in a 920 W appliance if the supply voltage is 230 V?

 


 

Assessment criteria

Task №

Descriptor

Mark

A learner

Distinguishes between the definitions of e.m.f. and p.d. in terms of energy

1

describes electromotive force in terms of energy;

1

describes potential difference in terms of energy;

1

shows the difference of e.m.f. and p.d.;

1

Uses Ohm's law in complete circuits to solve problems and explains the consequences of short circuit

2 a

uses formula of Ohm’s law for a complete circuit;

1

finds current for a complete circuit ;

1

2 b

defines the potential difference across the external circuit;

1

defines the potential difference across the terminals of each cell;

1

3

calculates the current drawn from the supply;

1

suggests why it may be dangerous to have a supply shorted out ;

1

States concepts of EMF and internal resistance

4

explains the term electromotive force (e.m.f.) of the cell;

1

explains the term internal resistance of the cell;

1

Makes practical calculations to show working and power flow of household devices

Makes practical calculations of work and power of household devices

5 a

calculates the work of a household device;

1

calculates the operational costs of a household device;

1

5 b

calculates the current of the device.

1

Total mark

14


Rubric for providing information to parents on the results of summative assessment for the unit Direct current

 

Learner’s full name _________________________________________

 

 

Assessment criteria

Level of academic achievement

Low

Medium

High  

Distinguishes between the definitions of e.m.f. and p.d. in terms of energy

Experiences difficulties in distinguishing between the definitions of e.m.f. and p.d. in terms of energy.

Makes mistakes in distinguishing between the definitions of e.m.f. and p.d. in terms of energy.

Distinguishes between the definitions of e.m.f. and p.d. in terms of energy.

Uses Ohm's law in complete circuits to solve problems and explains the consequences of short circuit

Experiences difficulties finding the current for a complete circuit/ defining the potential difference across the terminals of each cell/ calculating the current drawn from the supply/ suggesting why it may be dangerous to have a supply shorted out.

 

Uses Ohm’s law of complete circuits but makes some mistakes finding the current for a complete circuit/ defining the potential difference across the terminals of each cell/ calculating the current drawn from the supply/ suggesting why it may be dangerous to have a supply shorted out.

 

Uses Ohm’s law of complete circuits correctly when finding the current for a complete circuit/ defining the potential difference across the terminals of each cell/ calculating the current drawn from the supply/ suggesting why it may be dangerous to have a supply shorted out.

 

States concepts of EMF and internal resistance

Experiences difficulties in explaining the term electromotive force (e.m.f.) and internal resistance of the cell.

 

Makes mistakes in explaining the term electromotive force (e.m.f.) and internal resistance of the cell.

 

Explains the term electromotive force (e.m.f.) and internal resistance of the cell.

Makes practical calculations to show working and power flow of household devices

Experiences difficulties in calculating the work and operational costs of a household device/ calculating the current of the device.

 

 


Makes mistakes in calculating the work and operational costs of a household device/ calculating the current of the device.

Correctly calculates the work and operational costs of a household device/ calculates the current of the device.


Summative assessment for the unit Current in different environmental conditions

Learning objectives

10.3.3.1 – compare the origin principles of current in different environmental conditions

10.3.3.3 – give examples of using semiconductor devices

10.3.3.4 – explain the superconductivity and its practical use

 

Assessment criteria

A learner

·         Compares the origin principles of current in different environmental conditions

·         Interprets the features of semiconductor devices in the circuit

·         Describes the phenomenon of the superconductivity and critical temperature

·         States the applications of superconductivity

 

Level of thinking skills

 

Application

Higher order thinking skills

Duration

20 minutes

 

Tasks

1.    Name the charge carriers in

                      (i)          Metals ____________________________

                    (ii)          semi-conductors ____________________

                  (iii)          gases _____________________________

                  (iv)          liquids ___________________________

                    (v)          vacuum __________________________

 

2.    Draw and describe the V-I characteristics of metals and semi-conductors.

 

3.    Figure 3.1 shows a circuit used to monitor the variation of light intensity in a room.

Figure 3.1

 

Identify the component X and describe how the circuit works.

 

4.       (a) What is superconductivity?  

(b) The critical temperature for superconductivity for lead is 7.2 K. Explain what this statement means.  

 

5. What are the applications for superconductivity in everyday life?

Assessment criteria

Task №

Descriptor

Mark

A learner

Compares the origin principles of current in different environmental conditions

1

names the charge carriers in metals;

1

names the charge carriers in semi-conductors;

1

names the charge carriers in gases;

1

names the charge carriers in liquids;

1

names the charge carriers in a vacuum;

1

2

draws the V-I characteristics of metals;

1

describes the V-I characteristics of metals;

1

draws the V-I characteristics of semi-conductors;

1

describes the V-I characteristics of semi-conductors;

1

Interprets the features of semiconductor devices in the circuit

3

defines component X;

1

describes the role of component X in the circuit;

1

explains how the circuit works;

1

Describes the phenomena superconductivity and critical temperature; states the applications of superconductivity

4 a

states definition for superconductivity;

1

4 b

explains the critical temperature of superconductivity;

1

5

gives an example of the practical application of superconductivity.

1

Total mark

15


The rubric for providing information to parents on the results of summative assessment for the unit
Current in different environmental conditions

 

Learner’s full name _________________________________________

 

 

Assessment criteria

Level of academic achievement

Low

Medium

High

Compares the origin principles of current in different environmental conditions

 

Experiences difficulties in naming the charge carriers in metals, semi-conductors, gases, liquids, vacuum/ describing and drawing the V-I characteristics of metals and semi-conductors.

 

Makes mistakes in naming the charge carriers in metals, semi-conductors, gases, liquids, vacuum/ describing and drawing the V-I characteristics of metals and semi-conductors.

Correctly names the charge carriers in metals, semi-conductors, gases, liquids, vacuum/ describes and draws the V-I characteristics of metals and semi-conductors.

Interprets the features of semiconductor devices in the circuit

 

Experiences difficulties in defining component X/ describing the role of component X in the circuit/ explaining how the circuit works.

Makes mistakes in  defining the component X/ describing the role of component X in the circuit/ explaining how the circuit works.  

Correctly defines the component X/ describes the role of component X in the circuit/ explaines how the circuit works.  

Describes the phenomena superconductivity and critical temperature

States the applications of superconductivity

Experiences difficulties in stating definition for superconductivity/ explaining critical temperature of superconductivity/giving an example of the practical application of superconductivity.


Makes mistakes in stating definition for superconductivity/ explaining critical temperature of superconductivity/giving an example of the practical application of superconductivity.

Correctly states definition for superconductivity/ explains critical temperature of superconductivity/gives an example of the practical application of superconductivity.

 


TERM 4

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT TASKS

Summative assessment for the unit Magnetic fields

Learning objectives

10.4.1.1 – define the quantity characterizing magnetic fields of conductors

10.4.1.2 – use the left-hand rule and describe the action of magnetic fields on moving charged particles and current-carrying conductors

10.4.1.5 – explain the factors influencing magnetic fields of solenoids

 

Assessment criteria

A learner

·         Determines and explains the direction of the magnetic fields of conductors;

·         Describes the magnitude and direction of a force acting on moving charged particles and current-carrying conductors  in the magnetic field;

·         Explains the factors affecting the solenoid magnetic field

 

Level of thinking skills

Application

Higher order thinking skills

Duration

25 minutes

Tasks

1.    Figure 1.1 shows a wire XY which carries a constant direct current. Plotting compass R, placed alongside the wire, points due north. Compass P is placed below the wire and compass Q is placed above the wire.

Figure 1.1

(a)      State the direction of the current in the wire.

(b)      State in which direction compass P points.

(c)      State in which direction compass Q points if the current in the wire is reversed.

 

2.    Fig. 2.1 shows a wire, held between the poles of a magnet, carrying a current in the direction of the arrow.

 

(i) On Fig. 2.1, draw an arrow, labelled F, to show the direction of the force acting on the wire.

(ii) Explain why the force F acts on the wire.

(iii) The directions of the current and the magnetic field are both reversed. State the effect on the force F.

 

3.    Fig. 3.1 shows a negatively charged particle travelling in a vacuum, into a region where a magnetic field acts. The magnetic field, shown by the crosses, is acting into the paper.

4.     

(i) Draw an arrow, labelled F, to show the direction of the force on the particle at point P where it enters the field.

(ii) Describe the path of the particle as it continues to move through the magnetic field.

 

5.    A 4.0 cm long conductor carrying a current of 3.0 A is placed in a uniform magnetic field
of flux density 50 mT. In each of a, b and c below, determine the size of the force acting
on the conductor.

a

b

c

 

 

 

5. Fig. 5.1 shows a metal bar placed inside a vertical solenoid.

                                                   

 

The solenoid is a coil of several turns of insulated wire. A d.c. power supply is connected to the solenoid so that there is a current in it when the supply is switched on. The metal bar is a short distance above a small pile of iron paper-clips in a glass dish. The power supply is

• switched on

• left on for several seconds,

• then switched off.

Describe the behaviour of the paper-clips when this procedure is carried out using a metal bar of (a) aluminium

(b) iron

 


 

Assessment criteria

Task

Descriptor

Mark

A learner

Determines and explains the direction of the magnetic field of conductors

1 a

defines the direction of the current in the wire;

1

describes the rules for determining the direction of the current in the wire;

1

1 b

determines direction of the compass at point P;

1

1 c

states the direction of the compass at point Q if the current in the wire is reversed;

1

Describes the magnitude and direction of a force acting on moving charged particles and current-carrying conductors  in the magnetic field  

2

shows the direction of the force acting on the wire;

1

explains why the force acts on the wire;

1

describes the effect of force F;

1

3

illustrates the direction of the force on the particle at point P;

1

describes the path of the particle;

1

4

uses formula to determine magnetic force on the current - carrying conductor;

1

determines the magnitude of the force acting on the conductor in diagram a;

1

determines the magnitude of the force acting on the conductor in diagram b;

1

determines the magnitude of the force acting on the conductor in diagram c;

1

Explains the factors affecting the solenoid magnetic field

5 a

 

 

 

 

5 b

describes the behavior of the paper-clips when power supply is switched on using aluminum bar;

1

describes the behavior of the paper-clips when power supply switched on using iron bar;

1

describes the behavior of the paper-clips when power supply left on for several seconds then switched off for aluminum;

1

describes the behavior of the paper-clips when power supply left on for several seconds then switched off for iron.

1

Total mark

17

 


The rubric for providing information to parents on the results of summative assessment for the unit Magnetic fields

 

Learner’s full name _________________________________________

 

 

Assessment criteria

Level of academic achievement

Low

Medium

High

Determines and explains the direction of the magnetic fields of conductors

 

Experiences difficulties in defining the direction of the current in the wire /compass at point P/ describing rules for determining direction of the current in wire/ stating direction of the compass at point Q if the current in the wire is reversed.

 

Makes mistakes in defining direction of current in the wire/ compass at point P/  describing the rules for determining the direction of current in the wire/ stating direction of the compass at point Q if the current in the wire is reversed.

Correctly defines direction of current in the wire/ compass at point P/ describes the rules for determining the direction of current in the wire/ states direction of the compass at point Q if the current in the wire is reversed.

Describes the magnitude and direction of a force acting on moving charged particles and current-carrying conductors  in the magnetic field

Experiences difficulties in  showing the direction of the force acting on the wire/ the force on the particle at point P/ describing the effect of force F / the path of the particle/ using formula to determine magnetic force on the current - carrying conductor/ determining the magnitude of the force acting on the conductor in diagrams a, b, c.

 

Uses formula to determine magnetic force on the current - carrying conductor, but  makes mistakes in showing the direction of the force acting on the wire/ the force on the particle at point P/ describing the effect of force F / the path of the particle/ determining the magnitude of the force acting on the conductor in diagrams a, b, c.

 

Correctly shows the direction of the force acting on the wire/ the force on the particle at point P/ describes the effect of force F / the path of the particle/ uses formula to determine magnetic force on the current - carrying conductor/ determines the magnitude of the force acting on the conductor in diagrams a, b, c.

 

Explains the factors affecting the solenoid magnetic field

 

Experiences difficulties in  describing the behavior of the paper-clips when power supply is switched on/ left on for several seconds then switched off/ using aluminum  and iron bar.

 

Makes mistakes in describing the behavior of the paper-clips when power supply is switched on/ left on for several seconds then switched off/ using aluminum and iron bar.

Correctly describes the behavior of the paper-clips when power supply is switched on/ left on for several seconds then switched off/ using aluminum and iron bar.


Summative assessment for the unit Electromagnetic induction

Learning objectives

10.4.2.1 – explain the origin of electromotive force when changing the magnetic flux

10.4.2.2 – explain the Lentz’s rule

10.4.2.3 – explain the operational principle of electromagnetic devices (electromagnetic relay, generator and transformer)

 

Assessment criteria

A learner

·         Explains the production of electromotive force when the magnetic flux changes

·         Uses Lentz’s rule to find the direction of the induced current

·         Describes the operation principle of transformer

 

Level of thinking skills

 

Application

Higher order thinking skills

Duration

30 minutes

 

Tasks

1.        Which diagram shows a movement that will not produce the changing magnetic field needed to induce an e.m.f. in the coil?

2.        A coil is wound around a cylindrical cardboard tube and connected to a sensitive centre-zero millivoltmeter.

Figs. 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 show three situations involving the coil and a magnet.

(a) On the lines alongside each situation, describe what, if anything is observed on the millivoltmeter.

 

(b) Choose one of the situations in (a) where anything is observed on the millivoltmeter.

For this situation, state three changes which could be made to increase the magnitude of what is seen.

1. ......................................................................................................................................

2. ......................................................................................................................................

3......................................................................................................................................

 

3.        The diagram shows a magnet placed close to a flat circular coil.

Fig.3.1.

(a)      Explain why there is no induced e.m.f. even though there is magnetic flux linking the coil.

(b)      Explain why there is an induced e.m.f. when the magnet is pushed towards the coil. 

 

4.             (a) Induced currents can be formed in a coil of wire by electromagnetic induction.

(i)        Describe how to demonstrate the formation of an induced current in a coil of wire. Sketch and label a diagram of the arrangement of the apparatus.

(ii) State two changes to the apparatus that increase the induced current.

1. ............................................................................................................................

2..............................................................................................................................

(iii) The direction of the induced current is determined by Lenz’s Law. 1. State Lenz’s Law. 

(b) Describe how Lenz’s Law applies in the experiment you described in (a)(i).

 

5.        The transformer in Fig. 5.1 is used to convert 240 V a.c. to 6 V a.c.

Fig. 5.1

 

(i) Using the information above, calculate the number of turns on the secondary coil.

number of turns = ................................................

 

(ii) Describe how the transformer works.

(iii) State one way in which energy is lost from the transformer, and from which part it is lost.

 

 

 

 

Assessment criteria

Task

Descriptor

Mark

A learner

Explains the production of electromotive force when the magnetic flux changes

1

finds diagram which will not produce the changing magnetic field needed to induce  an e.m.f. in the coil;

1

2 a

describes what happens on the millivoltmeter when magnet is inside coil;

1

describes what happens on the millivoltmeter when magnet moves towards coil;

1

describes what happens on the millivoltmeter when coil moves towards magnet;

1

2 b

explains first reason for increased reading on millivoltmeter;

1

explains second reason for increased reading on millivoltmeter;

1

explains third reason for increased reading on millivoltmeter;

1

3 a

interprets why there is no induced e.m.f.;

1

3 b

explains why there is an induced e.m.f. when the magnet is pushed towards the coil;

1

Uses Lentz’s rule to find the direction of the induced current 

4 a

describes one method of the formation of an induced current in a coil of wire;

1

draws a diagram of the arrangement of the apparatus;

1

labels a diagram of the arrangement of the apparatus;

1

gives one way of increasing the induced current;

1

gives another way of increasing the induced current;

1

states Lenz’s Law;

1

4 b

describes how Lenz’s law applies to the experiment a(i);

1

Describes the operation principle of transformer

5

uses formula of transformer;

1

calculates the number of turns on the secondary coil;

1

describes how the transformer works;

1

gives one way how energy is lost in a transformer and in which part the loss of energy occurs.

1

Total mark

20


The rubric for providing information to parents on the results of summative assessment for the unit Electromagnetic induction

 

Learner’s full name _________________________________________

 

 

Assessment criteria

Level of academic achievement

Low

Medium

High

Explains the production of electromotive force when the magnetic flux changes

 

Experiences difficulties in   describing what happens on the millivoltmeter when magnet is inside coil/ moving towards coil/ towards magnet/ explains reasons of increased reading of millivoltmeter  explains  why there is/ is not an induced e.m.f.

Makes mistakes in describing what happens on the millivoltmeter when magnet is inside coil/ moving towards coil/ towards magnet/ explains reasons for increased reading of millivoltmeter  explains  why there is/ is not an induced e.m.f.

Correctly  describes what happens on the millivoltmeter when magnet inside coil/ moving towards coil/ towards magnet/ explains reasons of increasing magnitude of millivoltmeter  explains  why there is/ is not an induced e.m.f.

 

Uses Lentz’s rule to find the direction of the induced current  

Experiences difficulties in   describing one method of the formation of an induced current in a coil of wire/ drawing and labelling a diagram of the arrangement of the apparatus/giving  way of increasing the induced current/ stating  and describing  application of Lenz’s law.

 

States  Lenz’s Law, but  makes mistakes  describing one method of the formation of an induced current in a coil of wire/ drawing and   labels a diagram of the arrangement of the apparatus/giving  way of increasing the induced current/ describing  application of Lenz’s law.

Correctly  describes one method of the formation of an induced current in a coil of wire/ draws and   labels a diagram of the arrangement of the apparatus/gives  way of increasing the induced current/ states Lenz’s Law/ describes  application  of Lenz’s law. 

Describes the operation principle of transformer

Uses formula of transformer, but experiences difficulties in defining the number of turns on the secondary coil /describing how the transformer works/ giving one way how energy is lost in a transformer and in which part the loss of energy occurs.

Uses formula of transformer, but makes mistakes in defining the number of turns on the secondary coil /describing how the transformer works/ giving one way how energy is lost in a transformer and in which part the loss of energy occurs.

Defines  the number of turns on the secondary coil /describes how the transformer works/ gives one way how energy is lost in a transformer and in which part the loss of energy occurs.

 


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